Wednesday, 5 August 2009

Dunedin Cemetery Records Online

image via flicker

I have just spent a fascinating day researching.

The same distant relative I mentioned in my last post, had sent me digital copy of a cemetery record print out (to tie up some loose ends). At the bottom, I noticed the source was a website and a previously locked door was opened!

The Dunedin City Council website has an online search facility of the city's cemeteries. The results are more detailed than I'd expect - death date, burial date but also last address of the deceased and sometimes occupations. It also links to others buried in the same plot. This in particular has enabled me to discover people and links to other people, I wouldn't otherwise have connected.

I don't know how long this has been available for but I am so pleased I have finally discovered it. I know have some more pieces to help fit this puzzle together.

1 comment:

  1. Various death records can be a plentiful source of information about an ancestor's life. Usually you can find the date, place and often, the cause of death. The records may give the ancestor's previous address, how long they had lived in the area, their birth date and place, their occupation, and frequently the names of other relatives - both living at that time and those that had preceded them in death.

    Death related records may contain the maiden name of women relatives including the ancestor's wife or mother. You may also find information about other relatives that were buried close to your ancestor. If siblings were born and then died - between census years, the gravestones in a cemetery may be the only way you would discover their existence. Once you have that information, more searching of vital records may give a clearer picture of life events of these relatives. Tombstones also often contain references to the individual's membership in various fraternal societies, military services, occupations and religious affiliations.


    public records

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